1974-75 NHL Standings

1974-75 NHL Regular Season Standings

Adams
Team GP W L T Pts GF GA
Buffalo Sabres 80 49 16 15 113 354 240
Boston Bruins 80 40 26 14 94 345 245
Toronto Maple Leafs 80 31 33 16 78 280 309
California Seals 80 19 48 13 51 212 316
Norris
Montreal Canadiens 80 47 14 19 113 374 225
Los Angeles Kings 80 42 17 21 105 269 185
Pittsburgh Penguins 80 37 28 15 89 326 289
Detroit Red Wings 80 23 45 12 58 259 335
Washington Capitals 80 8 67 5 21 181 446
Patrick
Philadelphia Flyers 80 51 18 11 113 293 181
New York Rangers 80 37 29 14 88 319 276
New York Islanders 80 33 25 22 88 264 221
Atlanta Flames 80 34 31 15 83 243 233
Smythe
Vancouver Canucks 80 38 32 10 86 271 254
St. Louis Blues 80 35 31 14 84 269 267
Chicago Blackhawks 80 37 35 8 82 268 241
Minnesota North Stars 80 23 50 7 53 221 341
Kansas City Scouts 80 15 54 11 41 184 328

1974-75 National Hockey League Season

bernie parent philadelphia flyers 1974-75 o-pee-chee hockey cardWith the addition of the Washington Capitals and Kansas City Scouts, the size of the National Hockey League increased to 18 teams for the 1974-75 season. The league had now tripled in size since the 1966-67 campaign. The Capitals won just eight games, losing 67 and tying five for a dismal total of 21 points. Their expansion cousins in Kansas City fared a bit better with 15 wins and 41 points.

With the increase in the number of teams, the schedule grew with each team now playing 80 games, up from the 78 in 1973-74. Also, the NHL was adjusted from two divisions to four. No longer just the Eastern and Western, the NHL was now divided into the Norris, Adams, Patrick and Smythe divisions. Geographically, they made little sense.

The additions of Washington and Kansas City were not to be the only changes for 1974-75. Relocations were planned with the California Golden Seals moving to Denver and the Pittsburgh Penguins moving to Seattle. These relocations were nixed, however.

The Philadelphia Flyers won their second consecutive Stanley Cup championship, beating the Buffalo Sabres in the finals. Bernie Parent, goaltender for the Flyers, won the Conn Smythe Trophy as playoff most valuable player.

During the regular season, Bobby Orr won his second of two Art Ross Trophies. He remains the only defenseman to lead the NHL in scoring. Orr did it with 135 points on 46 goals and 89 assists while playing in all 80 games for the Boston Bruins. He finished eight points ahead of teammate Phil Esposito. Phil led the league with 61 goals in the days before the Rocket Richard Trophy.

The Calder Trophy went to Eric Vail of the Atlanta Flames. Vail put up 39 goals, one more than Gilbert Perreault’s 1970-71 rookie record, and added 21 assists for 60 points over 72 games.

The Vezina Trophy went solely to Bernie Parent of the Flyers. Parent appeared in 68 games, posted a 2.03 goals against average and recorded 12 shutouts. The shutout total ranks him 14th all-time, tied with several others, including Terry Sawchuk who had 12 for the Detroit Red Wings in the 1951-52 NHL season.

Bobby Clarke of the Flyers was awarded the Hart Trophy as the league’s MVP. Playing all 80 games, Clarke scored 27 and assisted on 89 for 116 points. His 89 assists tied him for the NHL lead with Bobby Orr. He placed sixth in the race for the Art Ross Trophy. For Bobby, it was second of three career Hart Trophy wins.

1974-75 marked the National Hockey League debut of future Hockey Hall of Fame forward Clark Gillies. It also marked the NHL finale for Hall of Famers Henri Richard and Norm Ullman. Ullman would go on to play two more years in the World Hockey Association with the Edmonton Oilers.

On an infamous note, Dave Schultz of the Philadelphia Flyers set the current mark for most penalty minutes in a single season. Schultz sat a knuckle bruising 472 minutes in the box, a whopping 196 minutes more than second place Andre Dupont, a teammate of Dave’s with the Flyers.

 

 

 

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